Keratoconus

What to Know About Keratoconus as Noted by a Portland, OR Optometrist 

While most people have rounded eyes, some peoples are more conical. Unfortunately, the shape of your eye directly impacts how well you can see. At Foster Vision, serving Portland, OR and the surrounding area, we stress the importance of routine eye appointments to detect problems early. Moreover, we recommend regular vision screenings for school-aged children.

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About Keratoconus  

Keratoconus is an issue where your eye is shaped like a cone, instead of a ball. It occurs when the inside of the eye begins pushing on a weakened or thinned cornea. As a result of the eye's shape, someone with keratoconus may experience blurred vision or have a sensitivity to light. In other words, the shape of your eye inhibits light from shining on your retina properly, which changes how well you see. You might have distorted vision or notice a sudden change in your vision. Some individuals report having clouded vision. Individuals with keratoconus often have frequent changes in their eye-wear prescription. 

A majority of people with keratoconus are between the ages of 10 and 25. The vision changes tend to occur slowly for about 10 years or longer, and then they plateau.

Diagnosing Keratoconus 

The first step to diagnosing keratoconus is to discuss your medical history and current eye health with our optometrist. Additionally, our eye doctor conducts a comprehensive vision and eye health screening. Our optometrist uses a phoropter to determine which prescription provides the optimal vision correction. During this portion of the exam, our practitioner has you look through lenses with various magnifying capabilities. You identify which one corrects your vision the best. You'll also undergo a test to evaluate you for astigmatism. 

Our optometrist analyzes the inside of your eye using a magnifying device. The slit-lamp test shines light into your eyes and allows our eye doctor to see the shape of your cornea. Other testing may be necessary as well. 

Treating Keratoconus

The treatment of your keratoconus depends on the severity of your condition. Additionally, if our doctor notices it progressing quickly, your treatment may vary a bit.

In the initial stages, our eye doctor determines the appropriate prescription to optimize your vision. If standard contacts aren't enough or are uncomfortable, our practitioner may use scleral lenses, gas-permeable ones, or two contacts in one eye. Hybrid lenses are also an option for some patients. 

Sometimes, in more serious cases, surgery is the only way to combat the vision deficit. Your eye surgeon will discuss the best option for your particular case. 

Schedule an examination with Foster Vision, serving the Portland area and beyond, by calling 503-546-4460. 

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